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Printable Blank Coordinate Planes

New Printable Coordinate Plane PDFs!

Coordinate planes are a staple of linear algebra, and having ready access to printable versions of these tools can be a big help when students are learning how to graph equations. I’ve had a meager collection of printable coordinate planes on the site for some time, but admittedly they’ve fallen into some dis-repair. Converting the older coordinate planes into PDF format and adding new homework templates has been on the to-do list for some time, and I’m pleased to announce they are finally all live on the site.

If you visit the new coordinate plane page you’ll find the not-quite lost single page, 4 quadrant coordinate planes that have lurked in a corner of the graph paper gymnasium for a while, ever hopeful that someone would find them there and ask them out to dance. These lonely grids are now happily socializing with many of their peers, including inch and centimeter dimensioned coordinate planes, planes with quadrant labels, and a new set of coordinate planes that are numbered and dimensioned along the edges of the grid instead of directly on the axis lines.

Also, you’ll find a completely new set of coordinate plane homework templates that are setup for single problem, two problem, four problem or six problem work. Print the size you need depending on how much work space or grid space you need to solve your particular problems, and those homework assignments will look super sharp.

You can check out all of the new pages at the link below, and if you have suggestions for more layouts please leave a comment!

Printable Coordinate Plane Page

Finally, I didn’t want the graph paper page to feel too left out, so when I also added dot paper and isometric dot paper to the party there. If you’re looking to do some 3D sketches, the isometric dot paper is a great tool, but either format can also be used for a round of the old ‘dots and boxes’ paper and pencil game that kept me and my girlfriend occupied during 10th grade history lectures…

Summer Math Worksheet Updates

Summer Updates Before Back to School!

I hope everyone is having a great summer and getting ready for the 2018-2019 school year!

It’s been a busy couple of months here, but there’s always time for a few quick math worksheet tweaks! It turns out there were a few spelling errors in the inches measurement worksheets and the metric measurement worksheets that needed to be fixed up. If you haven’t seen these worksheets, they’re great on-paper practice for kids learning to use either an imperial or metric ruler measure length.

The two youngest daughters are headed to a new school that teaches (of all things) Latin along side world history, so there’s ongoing interest in Roman numerals around the house these days. I already have some great Roman numeral worksheets and an interactive Roman numeral converter, but this round of updates includes a couple new Roman Numeral charts.

Finally, multiplication is always a hot back-to-school topic, and while we’re almost past mastering these facts ourselves, I’ve had some request for larger charts. If that’s you, please check out the new 30×30 and 50×50 multiplication charts.

We still have a week left before school starts, and we’re reviewing math facts like crazy, and I’m sure the girls are looking forward to the classroom so they can escape their crazy dad… What are you doing for back to school math practice? Let me know in the comments!

Printable Hundreds Charts and Picture Puzzles

Great Ways to Use a Hundreds Chart!

A hundreds chart? If you’re wondering why, for good gracious, you’d use one of these to teach counting, or even multiplication, you definitely won’t by the end of this post.

If you’re like us, you probably spend time in the car counting over and over again to 100. After having gone down this road (and many many miles of it with four girls now), I’m starting to believe it’s like staying in only one lane of the highway on a road trip to Puerto Williams, Chile (which, for reference is the southern-most city in the world, and I’m not sure you could even get there by car even if the math worked out somehow.)

So what’s wrong with counting, you ask?

When the kids learn to count orally, they’re often just learning a pattern of words, almost like a song. Oral counting is great, as long as there’s a mental model of number sense to back it up.

That’s where these awesome hundreds charts come in.

Printable Hundreds Charts

A hundred chart provides a visual representation of both quantity, and of the relationships between the numbers in the rows and columns of the chart. You’d be amazing how many kiddos can recite the numbers from one to a hundred in order, but when they’re confronted with reading a number off a page have trouble. We struggled here with the difference between 41 and 14 more times than I care to admit.

So print off these hundred charts, then start with some activities that build real number sense. Here’s a list of things to try:

  • Play the ‘Guess My Number’ game on the hundreds chart.That simple higher/lower game is great practice for reasoning about which numbers are bigger or smaller, and marking previous guesses on the hundreds chart will give younger kids the support they need. Make it competitive by seeing who can guess a number in the smallest number of turns (for adults who need a little extra edge, read up on binary search algorithms.)
  • Roll the chart up into a tube and count around and around and around…Nothing makes it clear that the numbers go in a continuous sequence like rolling a hundreds chart up and counting around the bend.
  • Cut the hundreds chart up, then put it back together again.We have an unending fascination with tape here, so this is always a winner. Print out one of the hundreds charts, cut it up randomly then tell the kid to put it back together again with tape. Bonus points if you time them. A good starter is to do this with one of the color hundreds charts which provides some color-cues to help make the assembly go faster, but you should move on to the black and white charts once the concept is clear.
  • Color in a hidden picture puzzle on the 100s chart.There are a ton of these online, but obviously the best hidden picture puzzles are right here at DadsWorksheets!
  • You can use a hundreds number chart to determine the difference between two numbers.This is a great activity for conceptualizing addition and subtraction. You can use a hundreds chart as a resource when practicing addition facts or subtraction facts as a substitute for finger counting (especially handy when you’re out of fingers.)
  • Play race to one hundred on the chart.You’ll need a game piece (or two if you’ve got more than one kiddo on hand) and a die. Start with both players on number 1, and have each player roll the die then move their piece that many numbers forward on the chart. The first one to get to 100 wins. Try having them only roll a number at the end that lands exactly on 100 to win.
  • You can do skip counting easily on the hundreds chart. A great activity is to print a hundreds chart and color in odds, evens or multiples of 5. Or, color multiple patterns and see where they overlap, a great start on understanding factors of numbers. Skip counting provides an opportunity to begin understanding the properties of certain sequences of numbers (for example, that adding two to an even number always produces an even number, or that multiples of 5 always end in 5 or 0). Even more so than using a multiplication chart to memorize multiplication facts, skip counting also helps kids build the number sense necessary for multiplication.
  • Find prime numbers using the Sieve of EratosthenesOnce you have a student who understands multiplication, division and the idea of prime numbers, you can use a hundreds chart to perform the Sieve of Eratosthenes, which is really simply way to not only introduce primes, but to discover one way that they can be revealed.

Any of these activities work well with the 100 chart or with the 120s charts available at the link as well… You’ll notice sometimes when kids learn what follows 100, it can be a challenge. That’s why some of the Common Core activities work with 120 instead of 100… It’s just a large enough range to get you well into that third place value, and it also fits nicely into some of those times twelve tables that you’ll undoubtably come across soon as well.

Whether you’re building up number sense or just using these number charts as a way to learn your math facts, I hope these new charts help move your math lessons on down the highway just a bit faster… Do you have some other great hundreds chart games or activities? Leave a comment and let me know!

This Mega Ultimate 100×100 Multiplication Chart is HUGE!

Multiplication Chart 100x100

We love multiplication charts here at DadsWorksheets, and whenever we get a request for more, I’m happy to oblige!

While the multiplication chart 1-100 is by far the most popular version on the site, and there are several charts with products going up to 15×15=225, I’ve had a couple of people suggest we could go big. Really big.

The result is this amazing 100×100 Multiplication Chart!

Let’s be honest, getting a 100×100 table onto a single printable page isn’t an easy task, and it took a bit of work. Still, every multiplication fact is legible and there are shaded guides at the x10 facts horizontally and vertically to help keep you from getting dizzy. Also, the perfect squares are identified.

It looks a little rough on the screen, but trust me… Printed, this multiplication is artwork suitable for framing! Or at least worthy of inclusion in your math notebooks!

Need more charts? Let me know in the comments!

Place Value Charts

Place Value Chart

Learning about place value is an important step in number fluency. Decomposing multi-digit numbers into separate place values can be confusing… How do you explain a 7 might mean 7, 70 or 0.7 depending on where it shows up in a number? As adults we take place value concepts for granted, but kids learning multi-digit math need a graceful introduction to the way the base 10 number system is used to represent values greater than nine.

These place value charts are a great place to break numbers down and figure out which digit has what actual value. The charts at the link below have several different versions, including ones with and without decimals, so they can be introduced gradually or at multiple stages in the development of mathematical literacy.

There are separate versions that include the three digit groupings (“periods”) as well as more traditional versions with each place labelled completely with it’s value. Please check them out and if you have feedback, let me know in the comments!

Place Value Charts

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